Sanctuary Groupie: Yoga Animalia Project Blog

Love from Florida: Sanctuary Travels from snow to sun

Yoga Animalia: Feline & Bovine - Wax On & Nandi, Indraloka Animal Sanctuary, Mehoopany, Pennsylvania

Yoga Animalia: Feline & Bovine - Wax On & Nandi, Indraloka Animal Sanctuary, Mehoopany, Pennsylvania

Happy Holidays! I recently visited United Poultry Concerns in Machipongo, Virginia on my way south, and I was absolutely delighted to finally spend some time with Karen Davis and the sanctuary residents. The human and avian team at UPC have been creating change for birds for decades, and I am so honored to have visited and photographed at the sanctuary which is a haven for formerly farmed animals amidst one of the most concentrated chicken factory farming regions.

Yoga Animalia: Galline - Rainbow, United Poultry Concerns, Machipongo, Virginia

Yoga Animalia: Galline - Rainbow, United Poultry Concerns, Machipongo, Virginia

I just arrived in Ocala, Florida at Kindred Spirits Sanctuary who are graciously hosting me as I  spend winter editing photos from two-and-a-half years of travel. My goal is to dedicate the entirety of winter to preparing the photos and stories from the 74 sanctuaries I have visited, with the hoped-for goal of getting ready to run a crowdfunding campaign in 2018 to make the Yoga Animalia Book a reality. More details about the book to come!

Yoga Animalia: Bovine - Owen, Kindred Spirits Sanctuary, Ocala, Florida

Yoga Animalia: Bovine - Owen, Kindred Spirits Sanctuary, Ocala, Florida

In the meantime, if you would like to support my art please consider becoming a monthly patron on my Patreon page. Asking for help as an artist is really challenging, but I am attempting to get out of my own way and make it easier to bring my sanctuary portraits into the world. Your support will enable this, and through Patreon, you will get neat bonuses not available anywhere else.

Many thanks for reading, and I hope your holiday season is surrounded by that which makes you happy. I will leave you with a few snow photos of my friends at Indraloka Animal Sanctuary.

May joy find you,

Cameron

Ogie and Mookie in front, PennyLove behind

Ogie and Mookie in front, PennyLove behind

Abhey, Greenie, Daisy, Decha, Galen, LucyLou Goosey, Lucy Goosey, Opie, Whitey, Peep, Bo

Abhey, Greenie, Daisy, Decha, Galen, LucyLou Goosey, Lucy Goosey, Opie, Whitey, Peep, Bo

Quicker, Joe, Whirlee Girlee, Fancy, Hubub

Quicker, Joe, Whirlee Girlee, Fancy, Hubub

Yin, Yang, Nod, Teehee, Lexi

Yin, Yang, Nod, Teehee, Lexi

How Best Friends Can Heal Your Wounds: Levi & Romy

Levi & Romy, friends for life, Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Levi & Romy, friends for life, Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Levi and Romy were two of the first Farm Sanctuary New York residents I had the pleasure of meeting. The pair were sharing a stall in the Melrose Small Animal Hospital which also serves as the nexus of shelter activity. They had just come in separately not long before (their individual rescue stories are below), and though Romy had taken no time at all to bond with humans due to his long convalescence, Levi was still terrified. Romy would come bounding toward me when I entered their area, but Levi hung back; Romy would head butt, hoof, climb, and in other ways let you know of his need and demand for attention, while Levi seemed content to let his friend deal with us bipeds.

Levi & Romy playing with the Postal Peeps in their stall in the Melrose Small Animal Hospital, Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Levi & Romy playing with the Postal Peeps in their stall in the Melrose Small Animal Hospital, Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Romy & Levi, Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Romy & Levi, Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

A highlight of my Watkins Glen time was the first time Levi came up to me and started to hoof at my leg - a demand for attention that some of you might be accustomed to receiving from friendlier sheep and goats. Such a dramatic difference from when I first arrived and he would flee in terror. Whether it is a sign of his growing acceptance that the humans around him now are there to help him, or whether he just had a particular nasty itch he couldn't reach and I was a convenient scratcher, this gesture made me giddy. Perhaps it is a testament to the power of friends that Levi slowly started to not only allow people close, but eventually to demand attention himself. Maybe he saw the interaction that Romy had with us and this spurred his healing, and maybe Levi just needed more time to acclimate. 

Levi, Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Levi, Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Levi is now a bona fide friend to the humans, perhaps inspired by his best friend Romy. Watching the transformation from scared new rescue to loving Farm Sanctuary resident brought me so much joy, and now Levi and Romy get to live out their lives at the newest Farm Sanctuary site: Jon & Tracey Stewarts' Bufflehead Farms in New Jersey. Click here for a ridiculous cuteness overload video of their arrival. When the newest location is open, Romy, Levi, and their new herd will greet humans with the love and joy they have received, and maybe even inspire healing through friendship for visitors.

Levi, Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Levi, Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Yoga Animalia: Caprine - Levi

Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Levi was found, scared and emaciated, in Brooklyn. It is suspected that he somehow escaped a live market, as his Kentucky tags marked “meat” indicate he was transported in to the city. How he escaped is unknown and miraculous, as this boy has issues with his back that cause problems with his movement and he may possibly be a fainting goat. However he escaped, Levi found his way into the safety of Farm Sanctuary where his terror has started to abate, and he will receive a loving community to help him come out of his shell.

Levi, Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Levi, Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Romy, Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Romy, Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Yoga Animalia: Ovine - Romy

Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Romy arrived at Farm Sanctuary from a small permaculture farm that raises sheep for meat. He was left in the cold night after born, and, when found the next day, the effort and expense to heal the lamb outweighed his worth to them. Farm Sanctuary was able to get him the veterinary care he needed - several months worth of hospital trips and intensive antibiotic treatments. During that time Romy only had humans as companions, and to this day adores hanging out with people. This sickly lamb has become a loving and happy sheep, lavishing attention on his human and goat friends.

Romy, Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Romy, Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Sanctuary Spotlight: Something of a Homecoming - Farm Sanctuary, New York

Full Moon at Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Full Moon at Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

I arrived at the Watkins Glen, NY birthplace of the farmed animal sanctuary movement at night. I had trekked through trees protesting my RV's passage, dirt roads that simultaneously shrouded and announced my transit, and a rather terrifying stretch of single-lane country road where deer could spring into my path at any moment. When my nerves settled with the pings of Katie Kowhugger's engine, I squinted to see the property on which I found myself - and I was awestruck. I had parked in the Farm Sanctuary visitor area, and in the wan August moonlight I could only make out a few buildings and a few moving shapes I would later learn were Nikki pig and two of her children. My desert eyes were flabbergasted at the moonlit suggestion of green growing wantonly everywhere I gazed. Four years I had heard stories of this place, and I was a trifle overwhelmed that I was finally there and had made it on my own. It looked like paradise, and I could only see a fraction of it.

By morning light I beheld the meander of fences framing towering red barns; the green expanses revealed varieties of hue and shade – trees and grass-carpeted hillocks and tall meadow flowers. The Visitor Barn before me dwarfed my expectations. What I assumed correctly to be the B&B cabins daintily blinked up at the rising sun with their guests. Lowing from nearby told me that one herd of cattle was readying for the day. The moving shapes I saw the previous night resolved into individual pigs exploring their meadow. A faint bustle of activity on the hilltop distance, in front of the only building not rouged but standing like a solidification of soft yellow sunlight, turned out to be the Melrose Small Animal Hospital and the staff heading out for the day. Behind me the front of the sanctuary was embraced by forest with only small pockets of human activity. There was magic everywhere my gaze traveled.

Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Luke, most perfect of all canines

Luke, most perfect of all canines

Part of the magic for me of Farm Sanctuary are the humans with or for whom I used to work. That was highlighted when my former boss Susie Coston, National Shelter Director and the human with whom the care of all beings non-human resides, drove up with Education Director Samantha Pachirat and the two canine companions that own Susie, Orville and Luke, the later of whom I refer to as one of, admittedly many, canine boyfriends. Orville wasted no time in nearly flattening Susie in his rush to escape the car, take a snort of my familiar scent, and then bound up and into Katie Kowhugger to lay claim to this new territory. Luke was a skosh more of a gentleman and at least let me snuggle him. Seeing these friends on their home turf was delightful, since I had only previously had the pleasure of their company at one of the California locations.

Many of the caregivers that work at the New York location are also humans with whom I feel fortunate to have worked, whether remotely or when they would come to assist at the Acton location where I used to be. Seeing so many faces I know, plus meeting many about whom I had only heard stories, was a joyous celebration after my cross-country travel and challenges. Despite having been absent Farm Sanctuary life for more than a year, I was welcomed in to the New York location as family, something I did not know that my heart had been longing for until it happened.

Ashley, Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Ashley, Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

In the quest of the Yoga Animalia Project I did not anticipate just how the lack of a stable base would affect me, the stress and anxiety it would cause; settling in for what I intended to be not more than a week but which became three weeks in Watkins Glen, I was able to discover a seed of home across the continent. Being able to pitch in and help with health checks, cleaning, or photos was a balm to my frayed nerves. The camaraderie and support from people for whom I hold so much respect and love was a gift.

But it was not only the humans that offered this support: the residents worked their magic upon me, creating new friendships and bonds I look forward to sharing in the coming month. Adding to this was the very place – all that green in the late summer sun radiated into my very being, allowing me to look out at the hills where the sheep grazed, the wallows the pigs created to cool off, the patches of curious ground the chickens inspected, the little trails the goats forged through tall and dense grass, and see it with eyes heavy with appreciation and gratitude. It was here at Farm Sanctuary in Watkins Glen, New York, the first sanctuary stop on my easterly travel, that the challenges of the journey paled in comparison to what I beheld: a vision of a more compassionate world.

Chuck, Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Chuck, Farm Sanctuary, Watkins Glen, New York

Roots of the Project: Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary

Daphne, Lincoln, & Apollo at the start of the drive.

Daphne, Lincoln, & Apollo at the start of the drive.

Daphne & I had a snugglefest during part of the drive. Did you know that many turkeys love to sit in the laps of humans? Photo by Alicia Pell

Daphne & I had a snugglefest during part of the drive. Did you know that many turkeys love to sit in the laps of humans? Photo by Alicia Pell

Lincoln & Apollo were model passengers.

Lincoln & Apollo were model passengers.

Costailo, Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary, Herriman, Utah

Costailo, Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary, Herriman, Utah

Clementine, Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary, Herriman, Utah

Clementine, Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary, Herriman, Utah

Sanctuary Spotlight: Ching Farm Rescue and Sanctuary

Each month I will aim to feature one of the sanctuaries and their residents whom I have gotten to know, starting with the sanctuary that helped me formulate what would become the Yoga Animalia Project: Ching Farm Rescue and Sanctuary in Herriman, Utah.

A rather magical thing happened on a turkey transport to Salt Lake City: the possibility of photographing all the farmed animal sanctuaries settled into my brain.

Before RV Katie Kowhugger was a glimmer of an idea, my trusty Calypso Prius provided transport to numerous farmed animal friends. On what would be the first trip to Ching Farm Rescue and Sanctuary near Salt Lake City, three turkeys - Daphne, a young broad-breasted white hen saved from a factory farm, and Lincoln and Apollo, broad-breasted bronze boys rescued before Thanksgiving from shelters – were ferried by my best friend and transporter extraordinaire Alicia and myself on a ten-hour journey. It was just after Christmas and as the uber-intelligent and weather-spoiled Southern Californian I am, I showed up at the snow-bedecked sanctuary in my Vibram toe shoes. It was cold. This may very well have been the start of my terror of all things snow.

The following day, despite the slow creep of cold into my toes, Alicia and I followed sanctuary founder Faith around and met the residents of Ching. It was the first time I was moving and photographing amongst sanctuary residents with whom I was not intimately familiar. This trip started my love affair with Abbott and Costailo sheep (read more about them here) and Alicia was wooed by Clementine turkey (his handsomeness is here); however, it also laid the groundwork for my next visit the following May when I would circle around from Missouri to stop in at Ching.

That May 2014 trip saw me freshly on leave from my job as a caregiver. The snow had departed by then, and I remembered my boots this time. Arriving at Ching I spent more time not only with the residents, but also with Faith. The outlines of the Yoga Animalia Project were starting to come together, and I shared my thoughts with Faith to get her opinions about whether it was too much to ask to visit and photograph and learn the stories of the residents: her response was enthusiastic and convinced me I could and should use my lens as a vehicle to tell stories.  Two days of sanctuary time gave me ample evidence that I could create portraits, coupled with stories from the residents’ caregivers, that would convey the personality of the sanctuary kids. 

I visited Ching again early in 2015 - Calypso Prius and I transporting a vociferous old lady goose named Serendipity from Las Vegas to the sanctuary. By this point it felt like visiting family, highlighted for me when Faith remarked how amazing it was I remembered the names of so many of the residents. That stirred so much joy for me. 

As family I grieve when individuals pass and celebrate when new individuals are rescued. With each sanctuary and each individual with whom I bond, my circle of compassion expands. Surely it encompasses heartbreak as individuals die, but I strive to live with an open heart, and my farmed animal friends inspire me to do so. My portraits become remembrances of those individuals who pass, and it keeps their stories alive. This has been a gift bestowed upon me by my visits to Ching. It is just one reason why I am honored to spotlight them.

For more information about Ching Farm Rescue and Sanctuary you can visit their newly designed website: chingsanctuary.org, find them on Facebook herefollow them on Instagram @chingsanctuary, and when you are in Salt Lake City schedule a visit to tour the sanctuary, and when you do, hug Abbott and Costailo for me, maybe flirt with Clementine, and make friends all your own. 

May so much joy find you,

Cameron

Sven & Sanctuary Founder Faith Ching, Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary, Herriman, Utah

Sven & Sanctuary Founder Faith Ching, Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary, Herriman, Utah

Abbott, Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary, Herriman, Utah

Abbott, Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary, Herriman, Utah

Serendipity was a demanding passenger compared to the chill turkey crew.

Serendipity was a demanding passenger compared to the chill turkey crew.

Bandit & Rose, Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary, Herriman, Utah

Bandit & Rose, Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary, Herriman, Utah

Rascal, Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary, Herriman, Utah

Rascal, Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary, Herriman, Utah

Lincoln, Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary, Herriman, Utah

Lincoln, Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary, Herriman, Utah

Daphne, Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary, Herriman, Utah

Daphne, Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary, Herriman, Utah

Apollo, Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary, Herriman, Utah

Apollo, Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary, Herriman, Utah

Serendipity Goose and I. She wanted to drive the whole way. Photo by Faith Ching.

Serendipity Goose and I. She wanted to drive the whole way. Photo by Faith Ching.

Trekking to the East, or How to Spend $3000 Too Quickly

Back pedal with me a bit - back to the start of the Yoga Animalia Project journey on July 25th, 2015.

Well, it really started much earlier than that, like three+ years earlier when the concept of visiting and photographing all the farmed animal sanctuaries first entered my brain. But the important bit for right now is that after all that time, all that hesitation and indecision, I finally sat myself behind the wheel of my new-to-me 34-foot RV, christened Katie Kowhugger (in honor of the amazing human who is one of the people largely responsible in so many ways for this journey being possible) though as you will see, she earned another, less favorable, moniker.

With all my printed art safely stored on board, I set off with The Traveling Yoda as my copilot. We were D.C.-bound for the Animal Rights Conference where I would have a booth for the second year with the Yoga Animalia Project. Along the way I hoped to stop and see some family and friends, enjoy the scenery, and make my way diligently toward the east coast.

Yoda as my copilot - what could go wrong?

Yoda as my copilot - what could go wrong?

I'll tell you what could go wrong: just outside of Flagstaff on day 1 of travel, Katie Kowhugger decided to stall out. Luckily traffic was slowed by construction so I was able to ease off the road onto the too-tiny shoulder (Katie is 8 feet wide for those picturing the ease of fitting a car onto the shoulder) after about five minutes of start-stop incremental movements. Several hours after contacting roadside assistance and feeling a skosh sea-sick from Katie's rocking as traffic whizzed by, a very nice gentleman was finally able to get my RV hooked up to his tow vehicle. Katie did not make this easy on the poor guy, and thus was her Diva title established.

Not a view I relished...

Not a view I relished...

After a thirty-mile-an-hour tow to the repair shop, Katie and I arrived in Bellemont, AZ at Bellemont Truck Repair & Towing in the late evening. I parked in their lot and passed out. Hurray for taking your bed with you.

The next day they were able to get me fixed up with a new alternator, a minor miracle considering it was Sunday, and I'm quite grateful for the crew at the shop for being there. While waiting I walked and tried to be all meditative and not panicked. It sort of worked. Cost of repair: $550; cost to sanity: stress of delay.

I stopped for a quick vegan grub fueling at the Whyld Ass in Flastaff, some more walking meditation, followed by a joyous photo opportunity with a painted cow friend.

Photo Sadhana: parsva virabhadrasana Warrior #fortheanimals

Photo Sadhana: parsva virabhadrasana Warrior #fortheanimals

Getting into Albuquerque Sunday night came with a wash of relief yet also irritation for the short amount of distance traveled. My walking meditation hadn't ameliorated the anxiety about getting to the Animal Rights Conference in D.C. by Thursday for set up. However I was hopeful I could still at least see some family in OK, though my planned detour to Missouri and friends was out.

On Monday I was in the middle of a rather empty stretch of the 40 between Albuquerque and Amarillo when I decided to stop for needed caffeination. Katie stalled out on the offramp. I think panic tried to assert itself on my brain, but mostly I was just too tired by the first ordeal to feel much. I might have called her a behemoth at this point.

Another roadside assistance call and several hours wait later, I was on my way backward to San Jon, NM and a repair facility. This experience was markedly less pleasant than my time in Flagstaff, which is a cool town; San Jon, NM is essentially the repair facility and the neighboring one it wars with, plus a convenience store. I also felt extremely taken advantage of since I had little choice but to pay for the brand new fuel pump they said I needed. Cost of repair: $1800; cost to sanity: gray hairs and ground down teeth.

My caption for this photo that day on Instagram:  At one point while these nice guys struggled with my stubborn motorhome to get her towable, I kind of hiccup-giggled because the thought crossed my mind that my diva motorhome just wanted men underneath her again. That was better than screaming to the heavens or dissolving into crying fits, but those emotive states are rather near the surface just yet.

My caption for this photo that day on Instagram: At one point while these nice guys struggled with my stubborn motorhome to get her towable, I kind of hiccup-giggled because the thought crossed my mind that my diva motorhome just wanted men underneath her again. That was better than screaming to the heavens or dissolving into crying fits, but those emotive states are rather near the surface just yet.

I am sure there is something of redeeming value along that stretch of the 40, some beauteous flora or fauna or experience, however my only thought as I left San Jon, NM behind was of relief to be gone and driving east again. I take that back, there was one beautiful being I met while waiting for Katie to be fixed:

Yoga Animalia: Arachnid

Yoga Animalia: Arachnid

Just as I was entering Amarillo, TX I saw a highway patrol officer behind me, and then his lights flashed. As if pulling Katie off the freeway wasn’t challenge enough, I had to do it while a law enforcement professional followed me. I had read previously that it was always a good idea to get out of one’s RV so you weren’t towering above the officer from the doorway. This I did. He was cordial (and as a bonus, cute), explained that he had pulled me over because I was swaying on the road a bit and riding on and over the solid white line on the right hand lane’s edge as he observed. I offered the truism that I was still fairly new at driving an RV, and provided my registration as proof to that fact. Seriously, Katie is like 11 feet tall, she sways like a drunken frat girl in the slightest breeze despite her rather, uh, prodigious, weight, and it takes a lot of effort mentally and physically to keep her heading mostly straight. Since I was chipper and alert (stress proved useful at this point), he could clearly see that I was not drunk, nor was I exhausted and making poor driving choices. He let me off with a warning. Thank the spirits.

This experience would have been nerve-frying enough, but (and this is when Katie earned the full moniker of the Behemoth Diva) as I started her up to leave, my check engine light came on for a third time. I’m sure there were expletives, there might have been a freak out, I honestly can’t recall fully. However Katie had not stalled again, so I determined to keep driving and at least get to Oklahoma City where options for repairs would be better.

I had to cancel meeting up with my family living in northern Oklahoma, because now the timing to get to the conference in D.C. was reaching a critical point, and I had to make the decision whether to stay overnight to try and get repairs in Oklahoma City and lose valuable (and cooler) driving time, or keep going through the night. Looking at options ahead, I realized I might be in for expensive repairs, both in time and cost if I broke down for a third time beyond the city reaches; there wasn’t a whole lot of options after I left OKC. I parked near a Home Depot at about midnight that evening when I finally got into the city, researched a repair shop, and tried to sleep.

The first handstand pic of the trip, which attests to my stress level that I didn't think to do one before I was halfway across the country.

The first handstand pic of the trip, which attests to my stress level that I didn't think to do one before I was halfway across the country.

Stirring the next morning with plenty of time to get to the chosen repair place as it opened, I first went into the Home Depot to get a few items including pegboards for a new version of my booth display. The employee who helped me was so kind and helpful, and flirtatious, that I started the morning more hopeful and cheerful than I otherwise would have.

Maybe it was this positivity, but as I started Katie up the check engine light was nowhere to be seen. I tried it a second time, disbelieving, and still it remained off. I decided a repair shop visit was still wise. Wise maybe, but aggravating assuredly. I proceeded to four different repair shops that morning, each one directing me on to the next because they didn’t work on that specific problem, or were too backlogged to assist me. Finally the receptionist at the fourth place took pity on me, maybe because I looked like a crazed person about to lose his composure by then or because she is a nice lady, and called her service manager to describe the issue to him over the phone since they were booked solid and couldn’t look at Katie in person. The suggestion was made by how I described all my recent issues that it was just an oxygen sensor that had been malfunctioning, but been purged since I stopped. I crossed my fingers, prayed to a few different deific manifestations, and got back on the road four frazzled hours later.

This is the point where the third time proves to be the charm: Katie Kowhugger chugged along the 40 and didn’t stall on me again.

Bridge to new lands not ridden by drought, the Hernando de Soto.

Bridge to new lands not ridden by drought, the Hernando de Soto.

After a brief stop in Little Rock, AR where I thought the 95 degree with 95 percent humidity was going to kill me, we crossed the Mississippi River into Memphis, a joyous experience, because all that water not evaporating immediately was so novel to my desert-born self. It was less novel when outside the RV and the sweat was pouring over my skin. I discovered on this portion of the trip that Tennessee is a very LONG state, and I was not as near to my destination as I needed to be. That drive through Tennessee I mostly remember for how long it took, how many extra miles I tried to manage after driving twelve hours, and, blessedly, green things. I finally had to stop before getting to the Virginia border and pass out.

Virginia is also a long state, especially following the 81 that brought me up away from Knoxville and into Virginia proper. I really don’t know where the eastern states got all this space since I was under the impression it was all compacted and faster to zip around once you got away from the expanses of California and Texas. The lengthy trek through southern Virginia I only really broke up by trying to visit a vegan restaurant in Abingdon (which I forever could only remember as Abbadingdong) and failing utterly after finding myself in the too-tiny streets of its downtown, trying not to have a panic attack as branches scratched across Katie’s roof and I searched for the relative safety of the two-lane freeway.

By the time I was in Virginia, I realized there was absolutely no way I was making it to the conference in time for Thursday set up, and had resigned myself to postpone my frantic activity for the following morning versus frantically driving to try and make even a part of set up. Joyously that decision somewhat alleviated the stress of driving, and at about midnight I rolled into the parking area of the Hilton hotel in Alexandria, VA where the Animal Rights Conference would be held, exhausted and relieved to be stationary. 

Finally arrived and set up at the Animal Rights Conference 2015, ready to spread the love of sanctuary and meet amazing people speaking up for the animals.

Finally arrived and set up at the Animal Rights Conference 2015, ready to spread the love of sanctuary and meet amazing people speaking up for the animals.

I am finally writing this blog post more than five months after this cross country trek occurred; it is New Year’s Day of 2016 and I am in the umpteenth Starbucks of my travels in Savannah, GA. I have been trying to determine the immediate next steps to best continue photographing the remaining farm animal sanctuaries, and, surprise of all surprises, stressing about it. My funds are running low, Katie needs some important repairs, and my wheels are tired. But I am happy. The issues will resolve themselves, support and guidance will arrive when least I expect it, and I keep reminding myself to go with the flow and trust. It took me these months to put this story into words, partially out of logistical distraction, but also because I was being a bit superstitious writing about the repair issues thinking Katie would retaliate with more problems. However New Year’s Day seemed like a good day to reflect on what has passed in order to make space for what is to come. Looking forward into 2016 I vacillate between a bit of anxiety about the unknown, but also excitement. This quest will continue, perhaps after a pause, perhaps without, but with the joy that I have found in connecting to sanctuaries and the individuals who reside there. My 2016 wish is to live with my heart open, accepting the good and the less so as it shows up to support and challenge me, and I wish that for everyone too: that we all live whole-heartedly and cultivate our compassion. To a joyous 2016!

Namaste,

Cameron