Sanctuary Groupie: Yoga Animalia Project Blog

East to South to West and Back Again

Frosty, Rowdy Girl Sanctuary, Angleton Texas

Frosty, Rowdy Girl Sanctuary, Angleton Texas

Oh, the Places You'll Go! Wisdom from Dr. Seuss that I recall as July finds me writing to you from San Francisco. Back in the middle of May I traveled south from my winter abode in Pennsylvania to Full Circle Farm Sanctuary near Atlanta, experiencing the beautiful new property to which they moved. Driving through southern parts new to my eyes, I trekked west in time for the New Orleans VegFest to bring some sanctuary love to NOLA, a city of many people who needs must travel 6-8 hours to find the nearest farm animal sanctuary. Then it was south of Houston to Rowdy Girl Sanctuary located in Angleton, Texas. My Prius got some long overdue doctoring before I headed northwest to Santuario de Karuna in Tijeras, New Mexico, very near Albuquerque. Afterward I trekked in to my home state to celebrate at Oakland VegFest.
    June passed in a beautiful SoCal fog of newborn human baby time as I stayed in Ventura, California and helped my best friend as she birthed my newest niece. The festival season is just ramping up though, so back on the road I go!
    I will be wrapping up my Northern California travels with a stop to visit Sweet Farm in Half Moon Bay this Friday. NorCal has seen a sprouting of new sanctuaries, and earlier this week I visited Goatlandia Farm Animal Sanctuary in Santa Rosa, Flip Side Sanctuary in Sebastopol, and Rancho Compassion in Nicasio, all very near San Francisco. I hope you enjoy the first photos of these visits in this blog post!
    Thank you for your continued support, and if a sanctuary resident's portrait can fit in your life or the life of someone you love, visit my Etsy page or send me an email at Cameron@YogaAnimalia.com. May so much joy find you!
    Cameron

June, Rancho Compasión, Nicasio, California

June, Rancho Compasión, Nicasio, California

Ryan Gosling, Full Circle Farm Sanctuary, Warm Springs, Georgia

Ryan Gosling, Full Circle Farm Sanctuary, Warm Springs, Georgia

Hondo, Santuario de Karuna, Tijeras, New Mexico

Hondo, Santuario de Karuna, Tijeras, New Mexico

Betty, Flip Side Sanctuary, Sebastopol, California

Betty, Flip Side Sanctuary, Sebastopol, California

Noll, Goatlandia Farm Animal Sanctuary, Santa Rosa, California

Noll, Goatlandia Farm Animal Sanctuary, Santa Rosa, California

Finding Nemo: One Goat's Journey to Sanctuary

Yoga Animalia: Caprine - Nemo, Uplands PEAK Sanctuary, Salem, Indiana

Yoga Animalia: Caprine - Nemo, Uplands PEAK Sanctuary, Salem, Indiana

Yoga Animalia: Caprine - Nemo

Uplands PEAK Sanctuary, Salem, Indiana www.UplandsPEAKSanctuary.org

Compassion saved Nemo’s life. Found at a goat meat farm lying in her own urine and feces, immobile and freezing, likely mere hours from death, Nemo’s rescuer secured her release from the farmer who had left her diarrhea untreated for a month. Likely intended for use as a breeding goat whose babies would be taken year after year, Nemo instead came to be lovingly cared for by a family that warmed her, fed her and gave her fluids until she could eat and drink on her own, who massaged her weak legs and helped her learn to stand again, and then celebrated with her when after six weeks Nemo finally walked. This family’s dedication also then secured a permanent home at Uplands PEAK for Nemo, where she settled in first with rescued calf Vegan, and then the goat herd as her strength grew. Now this affable lady shows no sign of her near-death experience as she gambols about the sanctuary, happy and loved.

Nemo Uplands PEAK Sanctuary

You can read Nemo's full story on Uplands PEAK's page here, including the heart-filling details of her first loving human family who saved her life.

Nemo Uplands PEAK Sanctuary

When I met Nemo, she was still living with Vegan calf, munching grass and twigs while he grazed nearby. Her affability with me, and her verve and pep, defies her origins, and this spirited lady has all the signs of growing into a fierce and dynamic individual.

Nemo Uplands PEAK Sanctuary

Selick: Brother Light

Yoga Animalia: Porcine - Selick, Indraloka Animal Sanctuary, Mehoopany, Pennsylvania

Yoga Animalia: Porcine - Selick, Indraloka Animal Sanctuary, Mehoopany, Pennsylvania

There are some beings that we bond with effortlessly, two souls recognizing one another and lighting up at the contact. Selick was one of those souls at Indraloka Animal Sanctuary that lit me up. Trying to outsmart (and always failing) his explorations and quest for food not his own, sneaking hoof trims and giggling when successful and he yelled at me for the intrusion, helping him shed winter hairs and blackheads like I was searching for gold, enjoying his slow descent to the earth for a belly rub and then the sounds of joy he proffered when the belly rub was especially good - these are moments of light that are now dear memories. 

Muddy adventures

Post Thanksliving Pumpkin Feast...for more than a month!

Post Thanksliving Pumpkin Feast...for more than a month!

The heart attack that took Selick's physical form cannot take these memories, but it did take that brother light. The grief will continue to hurt my heart and wet my eyes, but Selick's zest for life inspires me and all those who knew him. When the heaviness of his absence hits me, I am striving to remember that I am now one of the people whose light needs to shine in memory of this special boy. As I do with so many other lights whose radiance strengthens my own, I will continue to share Selick's story, his love, and his light.

Christmas Day Snuggles

Christmas Day Snuggles

Read on the Indraloka blog the story of how Selick came to sanctuary: the challenges he faced and his personal growth.

Selick 9-22-15 (8).jpg

Christmas Greetings from Selick

Thanksliving Spirit: Jake

Yoga Animalia: Meleagrine - Jake, Indraloka Animal Sanctuary, Mehoopany, Pennsylvania

Yoga Animalia: Meleagrine - Jake, Indraloka Animal Sanctuary, Mehoopany, Pennsylvania

On this overcast and warmer than frozen day, this day that solely caused 46 million beautiful individuals to be slaughtered for their flesh, this day where I headed into the upper barn to retrieve some meds before the sanctuary residents began their morning greetings, this Thanksgiving Day I began with sorrow.

This sorrow was not from dwelling on the 46 million individuals who lost their lives - I have built healthy and loving new traditions with family and friends that help create joy and celebration on what is otherwise a very dark holiday - it was instead from an unexpected discovery I made early this morning. There is a sense that caregivers develop; a sense of homeostasis disturbed, of energy flows disrupted, of something not-quite-right. That sense drove my attention to where Jake turkey was, or should have been, except Jake wasn't there, it was just his corporeal remains.

I am not ashamed to say I lost it. The grief hit my entire body and I sobbed. It is Thanksgiving day, ThanksLiving as I now think of it. The turkeys I know personally are supposed to eat pumpkin and explore and thrive. We had already had to say goodbye to two brand new turkey friends to whom we could only give a short amount of time due to their insurmountable genetic and physical problems, and I just could not bear saying goodbye to Jake also. But that is part of sanctuary work; we say goodbye when we think it is the last thing our hearts can handle, and I feel fortunate to know humans whose hearts hurt as much as mine, but who do the work and translate that sorrow into a beautiful part of life.

Jake was 13 years old; he lived a glorious and long life, and today was his day. The beauty of a free and beloved turkey's spirit departing on Thanksgiving Day was eloquently stated by sanctuary founder Indra Lahiri, Jake's longest human friend who had originally saved he and his siblings from slaughter prior to Thanksgiving in 2003. 

Indra's thoughtful and authentic response, even amidst her own grief to Jake's passing, had the intense effect of transforming my emotional space. It didn't hurt less, but rather it shifted my energy from tragic to something calmer. It opened up my ability to hold space for Jake's transition, and though my Thanksgiving began with sorrow, it ends with peace.

Beatific Emma: From Broken Beef Calf to Blessed Bovine

Emma, Farm Sanctuary, Orland, California

Emma, Farm Sanctuary, Orland, California

One of the highlights of early 2015 was this beauteous young lady who came into my life while road-tripping on a separate Farm Sanctuary-related quest spearheaded by my besty Alicia. Half way home from Vegas, the call about a calf in need arrived, propelling us to drive into the late hours. We stumbled into a hotel room, slept (maybe), then drove to the rural vet where Emma was supposed to be cared for overnight before we took her to UC Davis. That vet is not high in my estimation to put it mildly, having left her outside in a cold lean-to with barely enough straw for warmth and no pain meds. Alicia and I miraculously kept our tongues in check, got Emma pain meds, and got her loaded for the trek across Utah, Nevada, and into California for proper vet care.

Emma ready for travel

Emma ready for travel

I became instantly obsessed with this big-eyed girl, and wrung my hands a fair bit while we waited for positive word about her condition. Receiving that word brought a relief to my whole body and tears to my eyes. Though at that point she wasn't out of the woods totally, she had a fighting chance, and a beatific presence conveyed through those large eyes.

Tongue acrobatics not hampered by the pain in her leg

Tongue acrobatics not hampered by the pain in her leg

More than a year later, after trekking from New York to Florida to Pennsylvania and then flying back to California, I got to see Emma again, thriving at Orland. This young lady has endured months of hospitalization, surgeries, humans fretting, and yet she still carries serenity in her eyes and her being. She is such a magical friend I feel so blessed to know.

Yoga Animalia: Bovine - Emma

Farm Sanctuary, Orland, California

Emma was found on the side of the road in rural Utah. Her mother was standing protectively by her, and the concerned human who saw them in the same place a second time realized something was wrong. Emma had likely been hit by a car and was unable to walk. The woman contacted the rancher who owned the herd, but his solution was to shoot her. The woman got him to release Emma to her, but sadly could not get her mother. She contacted Farm Sanctuary who raced up to take the calf immediately to UC Davis. There life-saving vet care was provided to Emma, and it was determined her leg was infected and would need to be amputated. After many surgeries, much waiting, and many months, Emma is starting to settle into her three-legged life of love and devotion at Farm Sanctuary's NorCal shelter.